A farewell to my Hong Kong running route

This is also Hong Kong _ expatlingo.com

Does your regular run include lush jungle foliage, stunning views, an old plastics factory and a Tang clan ancestral hall? (If it does: Hi! I know you.)

The air in the Netherlands will be fresher, but God, I am going to miss this run. I am going to miss it even though I have left buckets of sweat there due to Hong Kong’s sauna-like humidity and summer heat. Buckets and buckets of sweat.

Hong Kong running route: I will miss you dearly!

(photos captioned throughout)

My run starts with a lot of up.

My run starts with a lot of up. Lots and lots of up. This is a mere fraction of the up. Am I a badass? Only when I run it without stopping while listening to the theme to “Enter the Dragon.”

Towards a disused notice board on the side of Cloudy Hill

Towards a disused notice board on the side of Tai Po’s Cloudy Hill.

Run 3 _ expatlingo.com

Past an odd, fenced-off, every-empty, but maintained tea garden near the ridge-line of Cloudy Hill.

Tree sign reading "花街" or flower street.

Tree sign reading “花街” or flower street.

View towards Tai Po and across the Tolo Harbour

View towards Tai Po and across Tolo Harbour.

View towards Shenzhen, China. One can just make out the skyscrapers.

View towards Shenzhen, China. One can just make out the skyscrapers.

View past the jungle to Tai Wo.

View past the jungle to Tai Wo.

Back through the jungle.

Back through the jungle.

I wrote a short story about the old man who sits in one of these chairs in the mornings (too rainy this day for him).

I wrote a short story about the old man who sits in one of these chairs most mornings (too rainy this day for him).

Temporary hillside gravesite for cremated remains (?)

Hillside gravesite for cremated remains, I believe.

More permanent hillside gravesite for cremated remains.

More permanent hillside gravesite for cremated remains.

Arriving at the bottom of the hill. Sign proclaims this as Government Land and warns agains dumping or excavation.

Arriving at the bottom of the hill. Sign proclaims this as “Government Land” and prohibits dumping or excavation.

Old "Tai Wah Plastic Leather Factory."

Old “Tai Wah Plastic Leather Factory.”

Warriors posted on doors of old "Tai Wah Plastic Leather Factory."

Warriors posted on doors of old “Tai Wah Plastic Leather Factory.”

Village alter in Tai Po Tau.

Village alter in Tai Po Tau.

1960s village house in Tai Po Tau.

1960s village house in Tai Po Tau.

King Law Ka Shuk: Tang Clan ancestral hall in Tai Po Tau.

King Law Ka Shuk: Tang Clan ancestral hall in Tai Po Tau.

Doors to King Law Ka Shuk.

Doors to King Law Ka Shuk.

Having passed under the MTR, I approach the Lam Tsuen River.

Having passed under the Kowloon-Canton Railway, I approach the Lam Tsuen River.

Crossing the Lam Tsuen River. At this point, the run can be lengthened by running along the river to Tai Po Waterfront Park. (Not today)

Crossing the Lam Tsuen River. At this point, the run can be lengthened by running along the river to Tai Po Waterfront Park. (Not this day.)

Mysterious pink building within the Mui Shue Hang Park.

Mysterious pink building within the Mui Shue Hang Park. Answers anyone?

Sign in the Mui Shue Hang Playground. Pity the fool who'd like to recline in the park!

Sign in the Mui Shue Hang Playground. Pity the fool who’d like to recline in the park!

"Do not touch (or try to post anything in) the exhibits."

“Do not touch the exhibits.” Why include an unusable park bench and fake post box in a park? Reason: unknown.

Passing back over the Lam Tsuen River. Spot the white heron?

Passing back over the Lam Tsuen River. Spot the white heron?

Running parallel to the train.

Running parallel to the train.

The glorious new foot and cycle path is (finally) completed) right before I move away.

The glorious new foot and cycle path is (finally) complete (right before I move away).

Yours truly in a mirror in under the Hong Lok Yuen roundabout.

Yours truly in a mirror in under the Hong Lok Yuen roundabout.

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26 responses to “A farewell to my Hong Kong running route

  1. What a beautiful way to say goodbye to Hong Kong. Thanks for sharing your run- lovely to see, and will look forward to your next adventure. 🙂

    • It was an awesome running route. Sniff… Glad I took the time to document it, even if it meant I carrying my iPhone in a plastic bag to protect it from rain/sweat!

    • The trick to start where I started is to gain access to the Hong Lok Yuen estate (where I lived until 3 days ago…). Or, you could start from Tai Wo and go up and then down. Most of the hillside portion of the run is Stage 8 of the Wilson Trail, which is easily searchable. Gorgeous! In the same area (and if you don’t mind uneven surfaces) there are good trails in Tai Po Kau around the nature reserve (also searchable).

    • I had to work up to that first long up over a long period of time! Should make my next regular running route (in the Netherlands) either really easy or really boring.

  2. You take amazingly clear photos for someone going at jogging speed. What gear are you using?

    But that is quite a run, and I think the trick would be to add your soundtrack.

    I think I’ll pin this for A so he can follow in your footsteps (no, but, literally) next time he’s there.

  3. Oh, wow! The Netherlands? That’s a big change!! I will miss your dear reminders of Hong Kong, but what an exciting new chapter you are starting!!

    • There are loads of lovely mountain walks in the NT! Not nearly as jam-packed as the Island walks! Happy to tell you what I know when the weather cools off.

  4. Jennifer, your HK jogging route looks fabulous, and I can imagine that you’ll miss it. But the Netherlands will have some interesting scenery, and NO hills. Your runs just got easier because, as you know, it’s flat, flat, flat. And, it will give you the opportunity to invest in some cool-weather running gear (Can you say Goretex?) ~James

    • Made it out on my first run around Utrecht yesterday and was delighted with both how beautiful and flat it was! So much to look at and explore! You’re right: I do need to stock up on cool weather running gear…

  5. Pingback: Running Utrecht: The sky is high and the pollution far away | Expat Lingo·

  6. Pingback: Toggling the Europe-Asia brain switch | Expat Lingo·

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